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Episode 33 · 11 months ago

Interview with Mitch Davidowitz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Interviewing the amazing Mitch Davidowit, trained psychotherapis, photographer, and mental health professional, he mainly has an expertise in grief pschotherapy.

You make me fast. Hey, guys, it's Yasmin and welcome to you. Can I ask you a question healthcare? Addition, so today we have an absolutely amazing guest with us today and his name is Mitch Dover, which. So please, may you introduce yourself to all audience. Thank you so much for the time to invite me for this. So My name is Mitch de Vidowitz. I am a psychotherapist, photographer, writer and teacher who has been practicing for many decades. I post my writings on facebook and Linkedin, and I have been a psychotherapist specializing with those facing loss, although I see many others, for over forty years. Wow. I'm also have been trained in mindfulness practices and even though I look like I'm only thirty, I have been doing that for almost fifty years. Wow. I began when I was twenty. Well, Hey, so that brings me to my first question. What got you inspired to become a psychotherapist? Yeah, you know, when I was a teenage juror and I'd be talking to someone, they would say, wow, you're a good listener, you should be a counselor, and I always had an interest in understanding people's minds and how they work. And so when I went to when I was in high school, I took some introductory psychology classes and then when I went to college, I got a degree in psychology and then I just felt called to being a counselor. It seemed...

...very natural for me. That is absolutely amazing. And how like you were. People would actually tell you that you're good listener, which you had the initial thought of saying. That's like of having people compliment you on things that you know they wouldn't really compliment on other people, which is absolutely amazing. It was a spar. It Lit the light inside of me. That really formed my whole life and being a therapist, psychotherapist, comes very natural to me, helping people to get free of their suffering. So my next question is, what will your strengths and limitations when it when it comes to becoming a psychotherapist? What were my strengths and limitations? Yes, in the beginning, you mean. Yes, so the first of the strengths that come to mind was that I cared deeply for people, that I really wanted to understand them. The second was there I had the ability to understand a little bit like emotional engineer, what was causing suffering, what people needed to do that would free them of the entanglement of their difficulty. Those were two very big strengths in the beginning and as I said earlier that I was a good listener. The limitation early on was that I was caring too deeply, that I was suffering with people as they shared their stories, and I needed to understand...

...very soon how to have a boundary, or in our computers, you know, we have to have a firewall, how to show up for people but not to get lost in the suffering. So that was my early lesson. Wow, that's I have no words, and so my next question is, would you describe yourself as a more directive person or a more guiding person? More directive or more guided? Yeah, you know, I would say more guided in that I really quiet myself down to listen to what I need to hear. What is the message, what is the truth? And out of that comes my movement. Of course not every second of every day, but my photography, my writing, my therapy practice is all driven by the guidance that I get in my heart and soul. I love it and that. But does that address that question? Tell today. Yes, I think really when it comes to like being in an area where you really love the work and you really want to pursue that type of career and you're also doing photography, how would you say the balance is, while balancing being a psychotherapist and if ato? Yeah, you know, that's a really powerful question, because they're both very connected. In order to be a good photographer you need to compose the picture. What is a picture? What will people like? What...

...will I love? And in order to be a good psycho therapist, you're helping people compose their life pictures. Right. What goes in the picture of their life? Do they want children? Do they want family? Do they want to live in the city? And so I would say one balance for me is this bridge of composition. But maybe more specifically to what you asked, is, in order to balance out the intensity of my work, I need things that are very light, right, because being a therapist is very intense work, even with a fire wall. And so my favorite thing to balance it out is that I love to photograph marching bands, and so my son was a drummer in high school in the marching band and then he went to college and I used to go and photograph that band and now I travel with them two different parts of the United States, here in the northeast, to photograph the joy of music, how they hold their instruments, love that they have for each other. So I that is my passion. Wow, that is a very deep passion as well, and I love how were talking about being a psychotherapist. You need to be able to picture what their life would want to they would like their like to look like, and I've never really looked it that way. So, hearing it from you, I think most psychotherapists need to do photography too, because it can help them to really understand their person and their clients situation. So that's beautifully said. And you...

...know people are offering afraid of the foot of going to a PSYCHOPO therapist. If they think of it as a photography teacher, they won't be scared because all they're doing is laying out the pictures of an issue or problem on the table and helping someone. Having someone help you to compose them in a way you feel better about what you're seeing. So my next question is, what is a typical session like? Yeah, very good question. So that the meetings last for about fifty minutes and I don't direct people. This is what we're going to talk about today. I asked them about their week, I asked them about how they're navigating the pandemic. I asked him about their relationship to their partner or child, and we begin there and usually that opens up a discussion about something that is a dilemma or difficulty for them. Yeah, and so the session is really a conversation, a story about how someone is moving in their life. Another way to think about therapy is that I'm helping people to change their story. So if the story is one of gloom and doom, I can't do this. How am I going to go on in this pandemic? How am I going to ever have a girlfriend or boyfriend?...

I'm not handsome enough for beautiful enough or smart enough. My work is to change the story that someone is telling themselves about what they're doing and what they can or can't do. So it's really editing and rewriting a better story. I I mean, like just listening to what you just said about you want to help them change the story. It came like a quote came to mine. It said, relax, this is on your chapter, it's not your whole story, and listening to what you said was, oh my gosh, I have no words, because it's really fascinating how someone who is so passionate in their field of work would be able to articulate how they want to help people and want to strive to make the world a better place and to teach people that, you know, the things that happened in your past isn't what makes up your future as well. Yes, absolutely. You said that you didn't have any words, but the words you just shared were very beautiful. Thank you. Really to recognize and give hope going from I can't to I can and changing the story. That's the most powerful thing we can do in our life is look at the story we're telling ourselves and be willing to rewrite it. Makes Sense. Yes, totally, and somebody. Last question is what advice would you give to someone looking to go into becoming a psychotherapist? Yeah, and so really to one of the things that would be enormously helpful...

...is to talk to other people that do it. That would be one right to understand and get a flavor of it, you know, really a sampling. The other is to ask yourself the question what brings you to that that calling? What is it that as you feel like you want to do it. The next is really, can you sit with other people suffering without being pulled down into it? And that's something one needs to learn how to do. I've been practicing a long time and it's really the art of being very present, moving very close, but also stand then back so that you can help. I think those would be some of the questions I would ask of myself, and maybe even to go on Youtube and listen to other therapists talk about their work. It's a very honorable career. Yeah, it's a really noble thing to do, to offer to help people, to be a guide through this challenge that is our life. So I certainly encourage it. If you feel like that's something you feel called to, that's great. Thank you and go ahead. I know you can go ahead fast. How did you come to do these podcasts? What what was the way that you decided yes,...

I want to interview people and well, being a fourteen year out in in London, I really wanted to open my eyes to different am careers and different things that people do. So one of my dreams is to become either an orthodontist or classic sergeant. So I mainly wanted to interview people that were in that field or people in other fields. That audience can I'm from and take advice from? Yes, that's really wonderful. And so when you open as you are to conversations, it really helps too, as as it is in photography, to open up the lens to wider picture. And so for you already to know what you might want to do as a fourteen year old young girl living in the United Kingdom, in London, it's a beautiful spark of possibility and you will know over time. Is that the flame that guides your life? But there are many people that know right from the beginning I want to be a doctor, and then they become one, and I think that was definitely true for me as a therapist. I wanted to help people, and here we are all these years later. Wow. Do you have any lass lets of advice to give our audience? Yes, and and tell me before I do that what is generally the age of the people that are listening to any age, all ages, okay. And so what I want to tell people is that it's very, very important. If you were driving in your car and there was smoke coming out of the hood you would immediately...

...pull over and get help. And all of us in this pandemic or dealing with some smoke coming out of the hood of our heart, if it feels like this too much to be willing to find someone who can offer help. A therapist is really just a trusted friend and ally who is a kind of a mechanic of the heart and soul that knows how to understand this smoke that is coming out. And so I would say in closing, if you're struggling in your life, don't let pride get in the way of seeking help. Maybe too simply have a consultation, a onetime meeting to see I remember a woman years ago coming to see me. She was crying. Her husband died and she said, you know, Mitch, I'm that coming back. I only came this time out of curiosity and I said, Mary, perhaps you would like to come next time just out of curiosity, and she said yes, I would like that and we work together. So I encourage your audience. If you are struggling, just out of curiosity, look and see who might be of help. Ye in counseling. That would be my final thoughts. Wow, thank you so much again for letting me interview you. Do...

...you have any social media handles that I can put in the link in down below? Well, people could find me on facebook under Mitch the VIDOWITZ. I'll spell it. It's David O Wi t z de Vitowitz DA v idow I ts day. They can find me on facebook if they would like to learn more there. They can friend me there, or they can find me on linkedin under the same name. Thank you. Thank you for taking the time to meet me. Well, you two, it was great interviewing you. Thank you. Bye Bye.

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